SfAA President’s Column

November 1, 2012

By Merrill Eisenberg
[merrill@u.arizona.edu]
University of Arizona

Merrill Eisenberg

Greetings SfAA members! It’s been a busy summer and fall (so far!) with lots of conference planning and organizational development going on here at the SfAA. I’d like to use my column in this issue to thank the 897 members who responded to our Membership Survey, to report some of the top-line findings, and to alert all of you to potential changes in our Bylaws that are currently under discussion.

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Asking What Makes Archaeology Public: An Ethnographic Look at Practice and Potential in Southern Maryland

November 1, 2012

By Ennis Barbery
[ebarbery@umd.edu]
MAA student, University of Maryland

Ennis Barbery

“Public archaeology” is a process, and not all archaeologists implement the same methods to engage the public. I draw on ethnographic fieldwork completed at four archaeology sites along the Patuxent River in southern Maryland in order to identify different working definitions of public archaeology and ask why archaeologists’ stated definitions are not always reflected in the public archaeology they practice. The contrasting definitions and practices of public archaeology highlight broader questions about who has the authority to interpret the past and why.

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Poco a Poco: Weaving Solidarity with Jolom Mayaetik Cooperative and the SFAA

November 1, 2012

By Katherine O’Donnell
[O_donnellk@hartwick.edu]
Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Hartwick College

Merida 2001. Merida marked the beginning of a decade of my experimentation with conference sites as textile markets for the Mayan women’s weaving cooperative, Jolom Mayaetik, Chiapas, Mexico. In 1998 when I first met members of the cooperative in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Jolom was marketing textiles in a little shop and sending textiles home with friends. I, too, became part of the friend network. I initially began developing marketing ideas for the campus where I teach. We had Salsa and Solidarity and Fiestas; I linked with Pastors for Peace and other US organizations. I also helped create a Fair Trade store in town. Later, my marketing with Jolom expanded to the AAA and five years of training and sales at the International Folk Art Market in Santa Fe.

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Present at the Founding of the Society: The SfAA Oral History Interview with Frederick L. W. Richardson

November 1, 2012

By John van Willigen
[ant101@uky.edu]
SfAA Oral History Project, Chair
University of Kentucky

John van Willigen

Interview by J. Thomas May and Peter K. New

This transcript is of an interview with Frederick L.W. Richardson done by Tom May and Peter New in 1979. Frederick Richardson participated in the founding of the Society and served in various leadership roles including being president. He became an important figure in the anthropology of industry and business. His graduate studies in anthropology included a 1941 Ph.D. under the direction of Eliot D. Chapple. Chapple was a founder of the Society and its first president. During World War II Richardson worked in a number of federal agencies. He followed this with academic appointments at the Harvard School of Public Health and the business colleges of the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Virginia. He collaborated in research at various times with Elton Mayo, Eliot D. Chapple, Conrad Arensburg and W. Lloyd Warner and did consulting with a number of large business corporations. His accomplishments in applied anthropology were recognized with the 1988 Bronislaw Malinowski Award, shortly before his death. The interview was edited by Prof. Richardson initially. His annotations are in parentheses. John van Willigen also edited the transcript; his editorial comments are in brackets. The transcript, in this abridged version, starts with discussion of applied anthropology and the society.

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Of Donut Shops and Oil Wells: My Semester as a Harman Scholar

November 1, 2012

By Susan B. Hyatt
[suhyatt@iupui.edu]
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

My colleagues in the Anthropology Department at California State University Long Beach (CSULB) were notably relieved when they arrived at their offices this morning, the day after the election. Their sense of having narrowly dodged not just a bullet but a cannon ball was perceptible, even to me. Their emotions were not so much a result of the president’s reelection as they were a consequence of a California ballot measure known as Proposition 30. This proposition raises the sales tax by 0.25% and income taxes on the most wealthy in order to raise funds for public education, from K-12 through college. The measure was supported by 54 percent of California’s population, a margin considerably bolstered by a large voter turn-out of young people. Had it not passed, there were grim discussions of drastic cuts to the faculty and severely reduced places for students seeking admission to the California State and University of California campuses, public institutions known globally for the quality education they have provided for several generations.

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