SfAA President’s Column

May 1, 2011

By Merrill Eisenberg
[Merrill@u.arizona.edu]
University of Arizona

Merrill Eisenberg

As your new President I want to first thank you all for your support. I am indeed very honored to be sitting in this position and promise you that serving you and the Society will be my highest priority over the next two years.

Read the rest of this entry »


Historical Amnesia and the Lattimer Massacre

May 1, 2011

By Paul Shackel
[pshackel@umd.edu]
University of Maryland

By Michael Roller
[mroller@umd.edu]
University of Maryland

By Kristin Sullivan
[sullivank@umd.edu]
University of Maryland

Dr. Paul Shackel, Michael Roller, and Kristin Sullivan

September 10, 1897, in Lattimer, Pa. marks one of the bloodiest labor strikes in US history. The Lattimer massacre is the result of a conflict between immigrant laborers and coal operators in the anthracite region of northeastern Pennsylvania. It left 25 immigrant men of eastern and southern European descent dead and nearly forgotten. Not surprisingly, the event is missing from the official memory of our country, and it reflects the control capital has over the memory of the industrialization of America. In remembering the massacre Howard Zinn’s (1980) “people’s history” is overshadowed by the accomplishments and paternalistic behavior of the coal operators. While the massacre has been erased from national attention, local community historians, clergy, community leaders, and a handful of academics have kept the story alive. In 2009 the Anthropology program at the University of Maryland committed itself to help raise the profile of the event with the goal of making it part of the national public memory.

Read the rest of this entry »


Anthropological Voice on the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster

May 1, 2011

By Barbara Rose Johnston
[bjohnston@igc.org]
Center for Political Ecology, Santa Cruz, CA

SfAA Newsletter Editor Tim Wallace sent a note to me awhile back asking if he might reprint one of my commentaries on Japan’s nuclear disaster. He wanted to be sure that the next issue of the SfAA Newsletter included a focus on events unfolding in Japan following the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. I suggested he include the article below, prefaced by an update on the nuclear disaster and a brief review of what some SfAA members have been doing to help shape and further stimulate public dialogue on the nature of this disaster and what it represents in terms of public health, energy policy, and disaster response.

Read the rest of this entry »


Waking Up to a Nuclear Nightmare

May 1, 2011

By Barbara Rose Johnston
Truthout (http://www.truthout.org/waking-nuclear-nightmare)
A shorter version of this article appeared in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists on March 18, 2011 (http://www.thebulletin.org/web-edition/features/nuclear-world-what-the-meaning-of-safe)

As Japan’s nuclear disaster continues to unfold, a growing number of its citizens and residents are beginning their transition, becoming the newest members of the world’s radiogenic community. Like the hibakusha, downwinders, uranium miners, atomic vets and the many who live in towns and cities that hosted the nuclear enterprise, they find their lives profoundly altered by a hazardous, invisible threat, where the fear of nuclear contamination and the personal health and intergenerational effects from exposure colors all aspects of social, cultural, economic and psychological well-being.

Read the rest of this entry »


Human Rights and Social Justice Committee Briefing 2: Pro-democracy and Dignity Uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East

May 1, 2011

By Hsain Ilahiane
[Hsain.ilahiane@uky.edu]
Department of Anthropology
University of Kentucky

“You can cut the flowers but you cannot keep spring from coming.” Pablo Neruda (1904-1973)

The Beginnings of the Uprisings or the “Days of Rage”
Like the fictional newsman Howard Beale’s “I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not gonna take this anymore!” angry outburst in the 1976 film, Network, North African and Middle Eastern progressive forces, young and old, have been demonstrating in the streets to communicate to most of the region’s “rulers-for-life” and allies that they too are angry and “as mad as hell and” they are “not gonna take” the oppressive political and economic conditions in which they live anymore. What began as a protest in the informal sector by a humiliated street vegetable vendor, Mohamed Bouazizi in Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia, continues with a string of uprisings that is shaking the foundations of authoritarian rule and is still unleashing a vibrant process of social and political change in the region and beyond.

Read the rest of this entry »


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.